NIOZ

CV AND PERFORMANCE MARGINALLY CORRELATED?

EXPERIMENT CLAIMS A CV MAY NOT SHOW TRUE POTENTIAL

No, it is not a scientific approach or statistically relevant, but it is a fun experiment to mix the names on CV’s of five über-performers and five slow-growers in the organisation and ask the management team to select the perfect candidates.

Take four managers from the management team in an ERP consultancy with 100 consultants, change the names of 5 top-performers and 5 low-performers on their CV’s and ask the managers to select the 5 ideal candidates. The result? Hilarity. Where did we go wrong?!

‘During the experiment, the board members unanimously went for the five low-performing employees. Because their diplomas and experience nicely lined up with their vision on the ideal employee’, says Jan Beyen, a consultant at Connect Human Capital, who initiated the experiment.

The ‘just profile’ and the ‘right employee’ are two completely different things, Beyen states. He believes that searchers and recruiters need to rethink their modus operandi -especially in connecting the CV to expected performance.

CV is an indicator

‘With the set-up of the experiment I directly linked ‘thinking’ and ‘feeling’ to own success and failure stories. I was aiming for the effect; the choice of CV’s was focused on realizing just that. I left out the employees who had a good resume and at the same time were top performers. I did the same with low performers with a bad resume.'

The learning? Experience and expertise are limited indicators and the resume is an indication of this. I believe that in the future we will look a lot more at language use, content on social media, likes. That is becoming much more predictive.'

Jan Beyen works at Connect Human Capital in Antwerp and is connected to a number of research groups that study ‘the future of work’.